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Server-based desktop deployments require licenses for desktop applications (such as the Office suite), the OS that runs them, and the server infrastructure for creating and managing server-based desktops
Although Microsoft Developer Network subscriptions are a valuable tool, understanding the rules and knowing how to administer subscriptions are key to reducing compliance risk
This report summarizes Windows 7 licensing rules and purchase options for conventional desktop architectures
This report summarizes Office suite licensing rules and decision criteria for organizations buying licenses in Microsoft Volume Licensing programs
This licensing outline explains the product licenses, licensing rules, and costs for on-premises SQL Server 2008 R2 systems
This licensing outline explains the product licenses, licensing rules, and costs for on-premises SharePoint Foundation 2010 and SharePoint Server 2010 systems
This report outlines the licensing rules and costs for on-premises Exchange Server 2010 systems as well as when Exchange is hosted in Microsoft's data centers on the customer's behalf
Windows Server OS licensing for organizations in Microsoft's volume license programs, including the types of Windows Server licenses, their estimated costs, and tradeoffs between different license types
Microsoft's volume licensing programs allow customers to purchase software licenses at substantial discounts, ease license management and software deployment, and are the only way to purchase many Microsoft products
Office 2007 packaging, licensing options, product usage rules, and trade-offs of purchasing through OEM, retail, and volume licensing channels
Report details SQL Server 2008 licensing options, prices, and rules—including rules governing use with hardware virtualization—and provides a comparison of the seven different editions
Licensing the Microsoft products used in any vendor's server-based desktop solution requires looking at three distinct layers of software to locate the Microsoft components
MSDN subscriptions offer significant benefits, but an organization has to manage the subscriptions to ensure they gain full benefits, while minimizing the risk of noncompliance
The Windows client OS weighs heavily in any organization's licensing decisions, and there are many license acquisition and compliance issues unique to Windows 7
The Office suite presents some of the most important licensing decisions for organizations
Factors complicating SQL Server licensing include the product line's eight editions, each with their own licensing particularities, and the option for customers to choose between several different licensing models
Factors complicating SharePoint licensing include the product line's four functional tiers, each with their own licensing particularities, and how other Microsoft products are prerequisites
Licensing of Exchange Server 2010 for on-premises use remains generally consistent with its predecessor, but new factors may increase overall licensing costs; Microsoft's hosted Exchange fees have declined, making them more attractive
Licensing Windows Server for use within an organization is generally straightforward but becomes more complicated for nonemployees, separately licensed server features, and virtualization
Types of Microsoft volume plans and the main factors that distinguish them from each other
The four main tasks organizations must perform to determine the type and quantity of Office desktop application suite licenses they'll need
Outlines the four main tasks organizations must perform to determine the type and quantity of SQL Server licenses they'll need
Office is a component of the application layer of many server-based desktops, so licensing it correctly is key to proving compliance during a software license check
Understanding the various MSDN editions helps organizations select the least costly edition to meet the needs of various members of an application development team
Most organizations license new PCs for Windows 7 Professional through their hardware manufacturer and upgrade existing PCs to that OS through volume licensing
The licensing model of Office suites in volume licensing is simple for installs on a single PC but more challenging for organizations with large numbers of PCs and other devices
Overview of Microsoft's volume licensing programs and purchase options and how they can be used to acquire SQL Server—related licenses
Overview of Microsoft's three types of volume licensing programs—Open, Select, and Enterprise Agreements—and how they can be used to purchase SharePoint Server—related licenses
Explanation of feature and price differences between Exchange Server 2010 Standard and Enterprise Editions
Outlines the various server license editions of Windows Server, their target market, technical differences, and precise licensing model and rights granted
Major reasons why organizations will need or want to purchase Microsoft software through volume licensing programs rather OEM or retail channels; also summarizes key common characteristics of all volume programs
Overview of 'premium' features included in Excel 2007, PowerPoint 2007, Outlook 2007, and Word 2007 only when these applications are purchased stand-alone, or as part of a handful of Office suite bundles
Technical features and licensing rules differ widely between SQL Server 2008 seven editions, so a deep understanding of a project's technical requirements is often required to select the most cost-effective edition
When customers use virtual machines to provide server-based desktops, the Windows OS in the OS layer can be licensed based on several licensing options
Although MSDN subscription rules appear straightforward, subtle edition differences and the state of applications in the development life cycle can impact compliance
Although there are six different editions of Windows 7, only two, Windows 7 Professional and Windows 7 Enterprise, have the features and management capabilities that organizations need
Organizations using volume licensing can choose between two Office 2010 suites for Windows PCs: Office Standard 2010 and Office Professional Plus 2010
Technical features and licensing rules differ widely between SQL Server 2008 R2's eight editions, so a deep understanding of a project's technical requirements is often required to select the most cost-effective edition
The server-side licenses required for a SharePoint Server 2010—based infrastructure include server licenses for SharePoint Server, FAST for SharePoint, SQL Server, and Windows Server
Explains the set of licenses that clients of an Exchange Server 2010-based system may require, including Client Access Licenses (CALs), External Connector licenses, and Outlook client software
Explains major points customers must understand when making Windows Server licensing decisions in environments where virtualization is or will be heavily exploited
Open volume licensing plans are aimed at small to midsize customers, although they can be used by enterprises and have become more complex over time
The trade-offs of licensing Office through OEM, retail, and volume licensing distribution channels, including differences in available packages and pricing, deployment technologies, and product usage rules
For three fee-based editions of SQL Server 2008, customers much choose between two different licensing models
Any server-based desktop infrastructure typically includes three key Microsoft products in the infrastructure layer, which must be licensed: Windows Server, SQL Server, and System Center
Policies and procedures that would help an organization deploying MSDN avoid overbuying or buying the wrong edition, as well as minimize the time and manpower required to show compliance
Software Assurance (SA) on Windows 7 Professional licenses delivers technologies and rights that can help organizations deploy and maintain large numbers of PCs, but organizations need to consider costs and alternatives
Software Assurance can reduce costs and simplify budgeting and financing for Office upgrades and aid license compliance, but organizations should consider payment timing and their own deployment schedules
Explains Microsoft's failover server provision, which allows some servers involved in passive failover scenarios to escape the need to be licensed for SQL Server
Explains the set of Client Access Licenses (CALs) that clients of a SharePoint Server 2010—based system require; details subset of product features requiring an Enterprise CAL
How Microsoft's three levels of hosted Exchange offerings compare and are licensed
Describes the rules that govern Windows Server client licenses, and notes situations where client licenses are not required
Describes Microsoft's Select volume licensing plans, useful for companies that have 250 PCs or more
Outlines the potential advantages of adding Software Assurance to Office licenses purchased through OEM and volume licensing channels
Summary of the rules governing which computers running SQL Server 2008 components need to be licensed
Links to additional Directions on Microsoft reports and other sources for more information related to server-based desktop licensing
Links to Microsoft documentation used in the production of this report and to related Directions on Microsoft reports
Organizations can choose among several volume licensing programs for Windows-related purchases, each with different advantages and drawbacks in license compliance, budgeting, cost, and flexibility
To license Office suites, businesses can choose among several volume licensing programs, each with different advantages and drawbacks in license compliance, budgeting, license cost, and flexibility
Several editions of SQL Server 2008 R2 give customers a choice between two or more licensing models, a decision that can have a significant impact on licensing cost, compliance overhead, and future flexibility
SharePoint Server for Internet Sites provides a way of licensing Internet or extranet sites accessed by nonemployees without having to purchase Client Access Licenses (CALs)
Links to additional resources about licensing on-premises and hosted Exchange Server 2010 systems
Licensing changes for Terminal Services, renamed Remote Desktop Services (RDS) in Windows Server 2008 R2, include new license nomenclature, merged licenses, price increases, and new licensing options
By simplifying license management and offering steep discounts, Enterprise Agreements offer an appealing way for large companies to license all desktop and laptop PCs with standard Microsoft software such as Office
Pointers to additional information about Office licensing options and rules, and differences between editions
Details the type and quantity of licenses required when multiple SQL Server database servers are run on the same computer via hardware virtualization or multi-instancing
Sources of further information on Windows 7 licensing
Links to additional resources about Office licensing and related topics
Illustrates the SQL Server— and Windows Server—related licenses required in four key SQL Server on-premises usage scenarios
Illustrates the SharePoint Server, Windows Server, SQL Server, and Office-related licenses required in five key SharePoint usage scenarios
Summary of the major Exchange Server licensing and packaging changes made between Oct. 2001 and Nov. 2009
Lists additional information sources on topics related to Windows Server licensing
Software Assurance (SA), Microsoft's subscription-based software maintenance plan, provides product version updates, support, training, and various other benefits
Pointers to additional information about SQL Server 2008 licensing options and rules, and differences between editions
Examines the trade-offs of licensing the Office suite through Microsoft's new Office 365 subscription offerings versus traditional volume licensing methods
Links to additional information on topics related to licensing on-premises SQL Server 2008 R2 systems
Links to additional information on topics related to licensing on-premises SharePoint Server 2010 systems
Pointers to additional information about Microsoft volume licensing programs and other licensing-related topics
Summary of the major SQL Server licensing and packaging changes made between 2000 and 2010
Summary of the major SharePoint Server licensing and packaging changes made between May 2001 and May 2010