Windows Server

Support for running most versions of Office applications on Windows Server will end by Oct. 2025, pushing organizations to Microsoft services for hosted session-based virtual desktops.

Multiple options exist for customers looking to license Windows Server for their Azure Stack HCI hosts. This report compares the pros and cons of each.

This kit collects recent Directions on Microsoft reports covering Microsoft’s server OS offerings, data-center management offerings, and developments in licensing and support of Windows Server, Azure Stack HCI, and Windows Server Azure edition.

A new offering in preview will allow customers to license Windows Server for VMs hosted on Azure Stack HCI on a pay-as-you-go basis through their Azure subscription.

Extended Security Updates (ESUs) can provide security patches for select Windows, Windows Server, and SQL Server versions that are otherwise no longer supported by Microsoft but vary in their duration and type of updates offered.

ESUs can provide security patches for select Windows, Windows Server, and SQL Server versions that are otherwise no longer supported by Microsoft, but their costs and duration depend on the platform used to host impacted workloads.

Windows Server 2022 brings price increases and triggers tighter outsourcing rules but does not make major licensing changes.

Extended Security Updates address newly discovered security issues for some software that has left Extended support.

Device-based subscriptions that provide at least three years of security updates and bulletins for legacy versions of Windows Server and SQL Server, as well as Windows 7, once versions have left the Extended Support lifecycle phase.